Broke 11K in annual dividend income

I’m ecstatic that I’ve now broken $11,000 in annual dividend/distribution income!  I purchased a few ETFs in my Canadian RRSP account that have good yields that have put me over the 11k mark (a covered call utilities etf and an international dividend etf).

Always looking for solid Canadian dividend payers!
I’m finding it difficult to diversify my Canadian holdings with solid dividend paying stocks that I’m comfortable adding to my portfolio at the present time.  It’s usually banks, and more banks, and as I’ve mentioned previously, I’m overweight financials.  If anybody has suggestions for any compelling Canadian dividend stocks that they presently feel are good values, please let me know!

Using ETFs to diversify my registered Canadian dollar accounts (RRSP, TFSA)
ETFs provide a good way to diversify my Canadian dollar portfolio by spreading the capital over many companies (and even foreign companies), but I hate holding ETFs in unregistered accounts because of the tax paperwork.  So I think going forward I’ll hold more ETFs in my Canadian dollar RRSP, and lighten up on the individual stocks in there.  In this way, I’ll have more individual Canadian stocks available for me to buy in my unregistered account, which of course also has favourable taxation on the dividends these companies pay.

So, my plan is to ultimately sell some of the Canadian financials I hold in my Canadian RRSP (I hold TD, CIBC, Laurentian and National, as well as Sun Life), and maybe repurchase a few of them in my unregistered account when their prices are favourable.

I really also need to decide what kind of sector allocations I’m comfortable with.  Right now, my entire portfolio is 22% in financials (the vast majority being Canadian banks). Perhaps something like 15% might be a good target.

 

 

 

Lightened up on Coca Cola

I sold half my shares of Coca-Cola (KO) today primarily to raise some cash, so I can shift some funds into something that I consider to be at a bargain price these days, with a bit of a higher yield. I haven’t decided yet what that will be.

I also successfully DRIPed my first share (synthetic dividend reinvestment through my broker, TD Direct Investing)! I now have one more share of JNJ, and $3 more of annual dividends! I’m going to think about which other of my holdings I want to set up dividend reinvestment on.

Portfolio update, March 2

Cash in emergency savings and chequing accounts: $36,000
Net worth (excluding house): $335,400
Total annual dividends:
$10,859
Investment returns so far for 2016: -0.12%

Note: I don’t take currency into account when I report these numbers.  II treat USD like it’s CAD for my accounting purposes. So, really, if I were to convert my USD holdings to CAD, my net worth would be higher.  I don’t bother with currency conversion because it’s irrelevant to me as long as I’m not selling anything and converting it to CAD in reality.  I plan on holding my USD assets until I retire and RRSP rules force me to sell them (or whatever I have to do at that point — I admit I haven’t researched that too much at this point in my life.  I believe I have to sell them and convert everything into an annuity or something like that).

Cash
As noted above, I keep quite a large stash of cash in my emergency fund.  I like the sense of security it gives me.  And since I hate my job and fantasize about quitting daily, I feel like any day at work could be my last if I lose it (my mind, I mean, which then causes me to lose my job).  Having this stash of cash helps keep my stress levels in check.

Annual Dividends
As I am a dividend investor , I try to always focus on my annual dividends, and not whatever the market value of my stocks may be at any given time. I hope to ultimately  live off my dividends without touching my invested capital.  A few dividend cuts (BHP Billiton and Husky Energy) have knocked my total annual dividends down in the first 2 months of 2016 (they were at around $10,900 at the end of 2015), but some purchases in January and February, as well as dividend increases from several of my holdings, have brought me back close to where I was in December.

DRIPing JNJ
I’ve instructed my brokerage to DRIP (synthetic) my JNJ dividends, so the next JNJ dividend will buy me a full share provided that  JNJ shares stay below $108.75.  JNJ closed today at $107.04 and their dividend will be paid in 8 days, so it’ll be close.

When I save up some more money in my USD RRSP, and if JNJ drops under $100 again, I’ll pick up a few more shares so it won’t be cutting it so close whether the dividend will be enough to DRIP 1 share.

Eventually I may consider DRIPing some other stocks in my account.  We’ll see if my brokerage, TD Direct Investing, fucks this up or not first.

Oil
Overall, I’m pretty happy with my portfolio.  Long term, I’d like to reduce my oil holdings (BP, CVX, COP).  I believe that energy will recover and my positions will all show a profit for me eventually (and hopefully pay me high dividends until then, though I’m fully aware that dividend cuts may be on the horizon if oil does not recover soon), but I never intended to hold this much in oil companies for the long term. It’s always been my intent to sell some holdings for a profit when oil recovers (and I do believe it will recover significantly eventually but I must admit that at first I thought the decrease in oil prices was a very short term thing).  BP is a good example of a company that I don’t particularly want to hold so much of in the future.

Husky Energy is an energy company that I regret not selling for a profit during a short window in 2014 or 2015 when I had the chance.  Before they recently cut their dividend completely,  they had not raised it a single time since I’ve owned them (I’ve owned them since 2009).  As an investor who concentrates mostly on dividend paying companies who increase their dividend payouts regularly, Husky doesn’t belong in my portfolio.  I’ll hang on until an oil recovery and then sell Husky (unlikely for a profit, I’m down almost 50% at this point, not including the dividends I did receive for 6 years) —  but there’s nothing on the Canadian market that I’m itching to buy right now anyway (and, besides, I do have a bit of CAD sitting around waiting to be deployed, so it’s not like I need the money that is tied up in Husky right now).

BBL 
BBL cut their dividend last week and I took my loss and sold my shares.  I think BBL is still a good long term investment, but I always struggle with not having enough USD to buy things I want, so I decided to sell for the cash.  I regret not buying more USD when the CAD was around par a few years ago but I did what I could with the money I had at the time.  I haven’t put any new money in my USD RRSP because the exchange rate is insane these days, so I have to suffer through the slow process of building up USD in my account through dividend payments.

I first started building my US portfolio back in 2008/2009, when stocks were very low thanks to the “great recession”, and the exchange rate was pretty unfavourable then, as well. A good example is that I first bought 50 shares of JNJ at $56 in 2009, but with the exchange rate my cost basis wound up around $68 per share.

Canadian Financials
I’m not thrilled with having so much invested in Canadian Banks, but I honestly don’t find many Canadian companies that I’m excited to invest in.  I believe banks will be paying increasing dividends for decades to come, so I’m not too concerned about their viability.  But I’d be a fool not to be a bit concerned with having such a large percentage of my investments in one sector.  My investments are separated in 5 accounts (Unregistered, USD TFSA, CAD TFSA, USD RRSP, CAD RRSP), and I haven’t set up the spreadsheet I use to track my investments so that it gives me info on my percentage holdings by sector, but a quick guesstimate tells me I have about 20% of my investments in financials, mostly Canadian banks with a couple of Canadian and US insurance companies.  I feel this is probably a bit too much in a single sector.  But, again, I feel like the Canadian Banks are strong investments, and they have great dividends.  Hopefully I won’t ever come to regret holding so much.

Recent buys and sells
In January and February of 2016, I bought:
US Stocks: CMI, DE, EMR, JNJ, OHI, XHC
Canadian: NA , AGU, AQN, BNS

And I sold:
US Stocks: BBL, INTC
Canadian: XIU

Anyway, enough rambling.  Here are my holdings, as of today:

Unregistered stock account (CAD)

Symbol Company name Shares Total Value Div per share Total Div
TRP.TO TRANSCANADA CORP. 200 $9,784.00 $2.26 $452.00
SU.TO SUNCOR ENERGY INC. 60 $2,003.40 $1.16 $69.60
HSE.TO HUSKY ENERGY INC. 204 $3,208.92 $0.00 $0.00
ENB.TO ENBRIDGE INC 40 $1,870.00 $2.12 $84.80
POT.TO POTASH CORP OF SASK INC 100 $2,449.00 $1.00 $100.00
AGU.TO AGRIUM INC 40 $4,690.80 $3.50 $140.00
GWO.TO GREAT-WEST LIFECO INC 150 $5,145.00 $1.30 $195.60
NA.TO NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA 200 $7,586.00 $2.08 $416.00
BNS.TO BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA 100 $5,775.00 $2.88 $288.00
BMO.TO BANK OF MONTREAL 150 $11,353.50 $3.36 $504.00
CM.TO CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMME 50 $4,610.50 $4.48 $224.00
LB.TO LAURENTIAN BANK 50 $2,316.50 $2.32 $116.00
CWB.TO CDN WESTERN BANK 75 $1,608.75 $0.88 $66.00
AQN.TO ALGONQUIN POWER AND UTILITIES C 200 $2,198.00 $0.39 $77.00
BCE.TO BCE INC. 80 $4,621.60 $2.73 $218.40
CNR.TO CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY CO. 30 $2,329.50 $1.50 $45.00
GWO-PN.TO GREAT WEST LIFECO INC PREF SRS 100 $1,275.00 $0.54 $54.40
BMO-PQ.TO BANK OF MONTREAL B PREF SH SER 200 $3,628.00 $0.98 $195.00
ENB-PH.TO ENBRIDGE INC PREFERRED SER H 100 $1,262.00 $1.00 $100.00
CASH $3,912.42
$81,627.89 $3,345.80

RRSP (CAD and USD)

Symbol Company Shares Total Value Div per share Total Div
JNJ Johnson & Johnson Common Stock 145 $15,520.80 $3.00 $435.00
PG Procter & Gamble Company (The) 100 $8,255.00 $2.65 $265.16
PEP Pepsico, Inc. Common Stock 100 $9,833.00 $3.01 $301.00
KO Coca-Cola Company (The) Common 100 $4,377.00 $1.40 $140.00
GIS General Mills, Inc. Common Stoc 40 $2,381.20 $1.76 $70.40
KHC The Kraft Heinz Company 50 $3,874.50 $2.30 $115.00
LLY Eli Lilly and Company Common St 30 $2,220.60 $2.04 $61.20
WMT Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. Common St 25 $1,655.25 $1.96 $49.00
OHI Omega Healthcare Investors, Inc 35 $1,152.20 $2.00 $70.00
ABBV AbbVie Inc. Common Stock 100 $5,570.00 $2.28 $228.00
PFE Pfizer, Inc. Common Stock 125 $3,747.50 $1.20 $150.00
ED Consolidated Edison, Inc. Commo 25 $1,757.50 $2.60 $65.00
GE General Electric Company Common 400 $12,072.00 $0.92 $368.00
EMR Emerson Electric Company Common 30 $1,512.30 $1.88 $56.40
INTC Intel Corporation 100 $3,054.00 $1.04 $104.00
CAT Caterpillar, Inc. Common Stock 45 $3,122.10 $3.08 $138.60
GOOGL Alphabet Inc. 15 $11,092.20 $0.00
BP BP p.l.c. Common Stock 260 $7,854.60 $2.40 $624.00
CVX Chevron Corporation Common Stoc 40 $3,485.60 $4.28 $171.20
COP ConocoPhillips Common Stock 15 $547.35 $1.00 $15.00
AFL AFLAC Incorporated Common Stock 25 $1,535.25 $1.64 $41.00
TD.TO TORONTO-DOMINION BANK 30 $1,595.40 $2.04 $61.20
DE Deere & Company Common Stock 59 $4,828.56 $2.13 $125.67
CMI Cummins Inc. Common Stock 15 $1,491.90 $3.90 $58.50
BCE.TO BCE INC. 50 $2,888.50 $2.73 $136.50
XEG.TO iShares S&P/TSX Capped Energy 400 $4,072.00 $0.35 $140.00
CM.TO CANADIAN IMPERIAL BANK OF COMME 50 $4,610.50 $4.48 $224.00
LB.TO LAURENTIAN BANK 100 $4,633.00 $2.32 $232.00
NA.to NATIONAL BANK OF CANADA 50 $1,896.50 $2.08 $104.00
CCO.TO CAMECO CORP 200 $3,328.00 $0.40 $80.00
HLF.TO HIGH LINER 50 $676.50 $0.48 $24.00
SLF.TO SUN LIFE FINANCIAL INC. 50 $2,028.50 $1.56 $78.00
XHC.TO iShares Global Healthcare (CAD 80 $3,079.20 $0.88 $70.71
XUT.TO iShares S&P/TSX Capped Utiliti 100 $2,004.00 $0.77 $77.00
CDZ.TO iShares S&P/TSX Cdn Div Aristo 200 $4,550.00 $0.82 $164.40
XGB.TO iShares Canadian Government Bo 100 $2,207.00 $0.62 $62.00
CLF.TO iShares 1-5 Year Laddered Govt 100 $1,907.00 $0.69 $69.00
XSB.TO iShares Canadian Short Term Bo 275 $7,812.75 $0.74 $203.50
Prov Ont 4% Bond 1 $5,000.00 $200.00 $200.00
US CASH $532.62
CDN CASH $4,052.89
CDN MONEY MARKET $953.14
$168,767.91 $5,578.44

 

TFSA (USD and CAD)

Symbol Company Shares Total Value Div per share Total Div
BMO.TO BANK OF MONTREAL 100 $7,569.00 $3.36 $336.00
BNS.TO BANK OF NOVA SCOTIA 155 $8,951.25 $2.88 $446.40
AQN.TO ALGONQUIN POWER AND UTILITIES C 400 $4,396.00 $0.39 $154.00
POT Potash Corporation of Saskatche 75 $1,367.25 $1.00 $75.00
REI-UN.TO RIOCAN REAL EST UN 50 $1,304.00 $1.41 $70.50
HR-UN.TO H&R REAL ESTATE INV TRUST 50 $936.00 $1.35 $67.50
URA Global X Uranium ETF 50 $645.00 $0.08 $4.15
T.TO TELUS CORPORATION 60 $2,347.80 $1.68 $100.80
XEG.TO iShares S&P/TSX Capped Energy 200 $2,036.00 $0.35 $70.00
XUT.TO iShares S&P/TSX Capped Utiliti 200 $4,008.00 $0.77 $154.00
TRP-PD.TO TRANSCANADA CORP PREF SERIES 7 100 $1,660.00 $1.00 $100.00
XSB.TO iShares Canadian Short Term Bo 200 $5,682.00 $0.74 $148.00
XIU.TO iShares S&P/TSX 60 100 $1,927.00 $0.51 $51.00
CWB.TO CDN WESTERN BANK 100 $2,145.00 $0.88 $88.00
AGU.TO AGRIUM INC 20 $2,345.40 $3.50 $70.00
US CASH $68.65 $0.00
CDN MONEY MARKET $25.18
CDN CASH $1,128.33
$48,541.86 $1,935.35

TD Direct Investing USD RRSP

Finally. After years of waiting, it appears that TD Direct Investing will finally allow holding USD in registered accounts. The are saying that this will be launched by the end of November 2014.

What this means is that, among other things, USD dividends will now be able to be accumulated in USD, avoiding the forced USD-CAD conversion that now occurs in TD Direct Investing registered accounts. Also, if you sell a US listed stock, the proceeds will go directly to your USD balance, and there won’t be a forced conversion to CAD there either.

Many other banks have offered the ability to hold USD in registered accounts for years (RBC and BMO come to mind). I cringe when I think of all of the money I’ve lost due to forced currency conversions in the past.

This is great news.

All that said, I won’t completely believe it until I see it.

Is this the start of a correction, or even a crash, in the market?

Probably not.

The DOW dropped over 300 points today, erasing the modest gains that it had made so far this year. Is this the start of the correction that is being spoken about more and more in the media (not that I really put much stock in what the media has to say in these matters — it’s really all just noise from people that get paid to make noise)?

There’s no doubt that the gains in the stock market since 2009 have been unrelenting, with very few pullbacks to speak of. It’s also true that, every time there’s been a pullback, I’ve wondered if it was the start of a correction, or ultimately another crash. And each time the market has roared higher. (As an aside, though, I tend to think that as long as interest rates remain ridiculously low the stock market will continue it’s upward trend … but I may be wrong.)

Truth is, though, as much as I’m certain that a major drop in my portfolio will not feel good, and it will be depressing to see tens of thousands of dollars disappear from my net worth, intellectually, and with a long-term view, I believe it will be the best thing that can happen for me.

My goal, as I’ve stated elsewhere on my site, is to achieve financial independence as quickly as possible. What this means for me is that I must achieve annual investment income that meets (and preferably exceeds) my requirements to live my simple, boring life.

The fact is that a major decline in stock prices will help me to achieve this goal quicker.

I’ve been keeping a fair amount of cash on standby in an emergency fund … always knowing that I would use this money to purchase quality dividend stocks should another very significant pullback/crash occur. So, honestly, the sooner a pullback/crash were to occur the better … it would allow me to deploy more cash and increase my dividend income at a faster pace.

So let me write out … I hope we have a stock market crash (not just some pansy-ass 10% correction) tomorrow. I believe I have the fortitude to withstand it and keep fear from getting the better of me. Let’s test my resolve for real!

My first Portfolio Update – July 2014

Since I just started this blog, I guess it make sense to post my portfolio as it stands right now.  Going forward, Ill post an update every month.  I’ll also keep my most recent update posted to the My Portfolio page.

2014 Annualizes Dividend & Interest Goal: $8,500

Current Annualized Dividend & Interest: $7,765

My Current Portfolio

(All costs are in Canadian dollars)

Savings Account (Cash) $30,548.29
CASH BROKERAGE
Cash $27.00
Money Market $9,282.50
Shares Avg. Cost Price Total Cost Total Value Gain/Loss Weight
TransCanada Corp TRP.TO 300 $38.51 $53.40 $11,553.71 $16,020.00 $4,466.29 6.44%
Husky Energy HSE.TO 200 $29.97 $33.67 $5,993.00 $6,734.00 $741.00 2.71%
Canadian Oil Sands COS.TO 100 $29.37 $23.15 $2,936.98 $2,315.00 -$621.98 0.93%
Potash Corp POT.TO 100 $41.45 $38.52 $4,144.98 $3,852.00 -$292.98 1.55%
Agrium AGU.TO 40 $96.00 $96.78 $3,839.98 $3,871.20 $31.22 1.56%
Great West Life GWO.TO 100 $25.48 $31.02 $2,547.99 $3,102.00 $554.01 1.25%
National Bank of Canada NA.TO 200 $37.47 $46.74 $7,493.99 $9,348.00 $1,854.01 3.76%
Bank of Nova Scotia BNS.TO 50 $49.58 $72.76 $2,479.00 $3,638.00 $1,159.00 1.46%
Bank of Montreal BMO.TO 150 $59.39 $80.36 $8,908.98 $12,054.00 $3,145.02 4.85%
CIBC CM.TO 50 $72.20 $98.24 $3,609.99 $4,912.00 $1,302.01 1.97%
Laurentian Bank LB.TO 50 $42.09 $50.48 $2,104.49 $2,524.00 $419.51 1.01%
Algonquin Power AQN.TO 200 $6.55 $8.03 $1,309.99 $1,606.00 $296.01 0.65%
Great West Life 3.65% Rate Reset GWO-PN.TO 100 $25.00 $21.51 $2,500.00 $2,151.00 -$349.00 0.86%
BMO 3.9% Rate Reset BMO-PQ.TO 200 $25.00 $25.15 $5,000.00 $5,030.00 $30.00 2.02%
ENBRIDGE 4% Rate Reset ENB-PH.TO 100 $25.00 $23.95 $2,500.00 $2,395.00 -$105.00 0.96%
RRSP BROKERAGE
Cash $20.00
Money Market $1,788.89
Shares Avg. Cost Price Total Cost Total Value Gain/Loss Weight
Johnson & Johnson JNJ 100 $66.14 $103.28 $6,614.26 $10,328.00 $3,713.74 4.15%
Procter & Gamble Co. PG 100 $62.89 $81.26 $6,289.39 $8,126.00 $1,836.61 3.27%
Unilever PLC UL 50 $41.96 $44.86 $2,097.99 $2,243.00 $145.01 0.90%
Pepsico, Inc. PEP 100 $58.46 $90.34 $5,845.53 $9,034.00 $3,188.47 3.63%
The Coca-Cola Company KO 100 $30.87 $42.10 $3,087.24 $4,210.00 $1,122.76 1.69%
General Mills GIS 40 $57.71 $52.93 $2,308.24 $2,117.20 -$191.04 0.85%
Eli Lilly and Co LLY 30 $37.10 $62.86 $1,112.88 $1,885.80 $772.92 0.76%
Abbott Laboratories ABT 100 $26.15 $41.17 $2,615.10 $4,117.00 $1,501.90 1.66%
AbbVie Incorporated ABBV 100 $26.15 $53.44 $2,615.09 $5,344.00 $2,728.91 2.15%
Pfizer PFE 125 $22.75 $30.41 $2,844.22 $3,801.25 $957.03 1.53%
Con Edison ED 50 $40.39 $56.38 $2,019.59 $2,819.00 $799.41 1.13%
General Electric Co. GE 400 $17.14 $26.61 $6,856.70 $10,644.00 $3,787.30 4.28%
Intel Corporation INTC 200 $21.57 $31.71 $4,313.64 $6,342.00 $2,028.36 2.55%
Corning Inc. GLW 250 $16.84 $21.96 $4,210.58 $5,490.00 $1,279.42 2.21%
Google Class C GOOG 9 $331.38 $584.78 $2,982.39 $5,263.02 $2,280.63 2.12%
Google Class A GOOGL 15 $442.63 $593.06 $6,639.42 $8,895.90 $2,256.48 3.58%
Apple Inc. AAPL 21 $79.99 $95.32 $1,679.79 $2,001.72 $321.93 0.80%
BP p.l.c. Common BP 50 $42.45 $51.70 $2,122.73 $2,585.00 $462.27 1.04%
Chevron Corporati CVX 25 $126.72 $129.26 $3,168.01 $3,231.50 $63.49 1.30%
AFLAC Incorporate AFL 25 $68.85 $62.84 $1,721.30 $1,571.00 -$150.30 0.63%
CIBC CM.TO 50 $72.05 $98.24 $3,602.49 $4,912.00 $1,309.51 1.97%
Laurentian Bank LB.TO 100 $43.60 $50.48 $4,359.99 $5,048.00 $688.01 2.03%
Cameco CCO.TO 200 $22.05 $20.67 $4,409.99 $4,134.00 -$275.99 1.66%
iSHARES SP TSX 60 XIU.TO 100 $17.35 $21.84 $1,734.99 $2,184.00 $449.01 0.88%
iShares Cdn Div CDZ.TO 100 $23.25 $26.05 $2,324.99 $2,605.00 $280.01 1.05%
TD Short Term Bond TD*SHO 418.3786 $10.04 $9.90 $4,200.62 $4,141.97 -$58.65 1.67%
Province of Ontario 4.00% 02 Jun 2021 PROVONT4 1 $4,984.52 $5,000.00 $4,984.52 $5,000.00 $15.48 2.01%
Cdn Government Bond Index Fund XGB.TO 100 $20.54 $21.37 $2,053.99 $2,137.00 $83.01 0.86%
Ishares 1-5 yr Laddered Govt Bond CLF.TO 100 $19.48 $19.32 $1,947.99 $1,932.00 -$15.99 0.78%
Cdn Short Bond Index XSB.TO 100 $28.56 $28.64 $2,855.99 $2,864.00 $8.01 1.15%
Tax Free Savings Account Brokerage
Cash $3,040.27 $3,040.27
Shares Avg. Cost Price Total Cost Total Value Gain/Loss Weight
Bank of Montreal BMO.TO 100 $58.60 $80.36 $5,859.98 $8,036.00 $2,176.02 3.23%
Algonquin Power & Utilities Corp. AQN.TO 300 $6.73 $8.03 $2,019.99 $2,409.00 $389.01 0.97%
Global X Uranium URA 100 $20.55 $14.51 $2,055.24 $1,451.00 -$604.24 0.58%
GOLDCORP INC G.TO 200 $27.65 $29.03 $5,529.97 $5,805.99 $276.02 2.33%
iShares Emerging Markets XEM.TO 100 $25.00 $26.88 $2,499.99 $2,688.00 $188.01 1.08%
ISHARES REIT XRE.TO 100 $15.85 $16.28 $1,584.99 $1,628.00 $43.01 0.65%
iShares Capped Utilities XUT.TO 100 $19.45 $19.97 $1,944.99 $1,997.00 $52.01 0.80%
TransCanada  4% Rate Reset TRP-PD.TO 100 $25.00 $25.17 $2,500.00 $2,517.00 $17.00 1.01%
TD Short Term Bond TD*SHO 772.3371 $10.00 $9.90 $7,726.97 $7,646.14 -$80.83 3.07%
Total Equity & Fixed Income (84.76%) $248,737.69
Total Cash & Money Market (15.24%) $44,706.95
GRAND TOTALS $202,264.85 $293,444.64

About me, and who cares?

It’s kind of funny writing in a blog.  I’ve never had one before, and especially typing right now, when I know no one even knows this blog exists, seems a little pointless and self-absorbed.  But I’m actually nothing if not self-absorbed (and self-loathing, but that’s for another post), so I guess I’ll trudge onward.

Ultimately, I guess I’m posting here to keep a record of my investing thoughts over time, so I can look back later and maybe learn something.  It might also help me keep track of stocks that I want to keep an eye on (which is what my first post on this blog was for).
If anyone winds up seeing whatever I post and finds any value in it, so much the better!
All that said, I posted a bit about myself and my investment focus to my About me page, and I’ll add more over time.